Balmus Laboratory

Nat10 paper


Targeting NAT10 enhances healthspan in a mouse model of human accelerated aging syndrome.


Gabriel Balmus, Delphine Larrieu, Ana C Barros, Casey Collins, Monica Abrudan, Mukerrem Demir, Nicola J Geisler, Christopher J Lelliott, Jacqueline K White, Natasha A Karp, James Atkinson, Andrea Kirton, Matt Jacobsen, Dean Clift, Raphael Rodriguez, David J Adams, Stephen P Jackson
Nature Communications 9 (1) 1700 

Abstract

Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) is a rare, but devastating genetic disease characterized by segmental premature aging, with cardiovascular disease being the main cause of death. Cells from HGPS patients accumulate progerin, a permanently farnesylated, toxic form of Lamin A, disrupting the nuclear shape and chromatin organization, leading to DNA-damage accumulation and senescence. Therapeutic approaches targeting farnesylation or aiming to reduce progerin levels have provided only partial health improvements. Recently, we identified Remodelin, a small-molecule agent that leads to amelioration of HGPS cellular defects through inhibition of the enzyme N-acetyltransferase 10 (NAT10). Here, we show the preclinical data demonstrating that targeting NAT10 in vivo, either via chemical inhibition or genetic depletion, significantly enhances the healthspan in a LmnaG609G HGPS mouse model. Collectively, the data provided here highlights NAT10 as a potential therapeutic target for HGPS.


Coronary Rgf.jpg

Rescue of smooth muscle actin staining (green) loss in the a heart coronary artery from Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) mice treated with Remodelin.